Webinar - 1 week access! $300 + GST

Kevin Webinar.png
Kevin Webinar.png

Webinar - 1 week access! $300 + GST

300.00

Keeping the Brain in Mind

This training looks at the connection between dysfunctional early life experiences and problematic behaviour by examining what we know about the neurological impact of early trauma and insecure attachment relationships on children and adolescents.  We will present a treatment approach which seeks to integrate the brain and body based research on trauma and attachment and our understanding of "healthy" childhood developmental progress rather than those that "solely" look to find a means for stopping negative behaviour.  Age range: 6-21 years.

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Children and adolescents with histories of trauma and attachment difficulties often present as the most challenging cases within the social service, mental health, and educational systems.  Many of these youth have problems effectively meeting the demands of their daily lives, which can result in creating crisis in their homes, failure in their classrooms and disruptions in the community.  Frequently, service providers and educators try to address the overt symptoms and behavioural issues these youth present without a context for understand the kind of processing obstacles and triggers the child may be struggling with.

Research has shown a connection between early trauma experiences, attachment difficulties and disrupted neurological development in children.  The effect of these early developmental experiences can have a significant impact on specific brain functions such as emotional and behavioural regulation, language processing, and adaptive decision-making.  Given that many of the young people that we treat come from backgrounds with histories of abuse, neglect, and/or family dysfunction; this research is particularly pertinent to how we understand and intervene in our client's behaviour.


Kevin Creeden, M.A., LMHC is the Director of Assessment and Research at the Whitnesy Academy in East Freetown, MA.  He has over 25 years of clinical experience treating children, adolescents, and their families working extensively with sexually and physically aggressive youth.  Over the past 25 years, his primary focus has been on issues of trauma and attachment difficulties, especially with regard to the neurological impact of trauma on behaviour.  He has authorise article and book chapters on the neurodevelopment impact of trauma on sexual behaviour problems and sexual offenders behaviour.  In the past, Mr Creeden has been a Teaching Fellow at Boston College, and an Instructor in Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School at Cambridge Hospital.  Presently, he is a guest faculty a the Simmons School of Social Work's advanced training program for trauma-informed care.  Mr Creeden  trains and consults nationally and internationally to youth services, community, mental health, and forensic service programs.